Three Peaks for Curlew – Success!

I am delighted to announce that yesterday, following an exhausting day of trekking in the Yorkshire Dales, myself, Sacha Elliot and Tiffany Francis (otherwise known as the Curlew Crusaders) concluded our three peaks for Curlew challenge. Hooray! Taking in the peaks of Pen-y-ghent, Whernside (in my opinion, the worst of the three) and Ingleborough, we completed the twenty-six-mile hike…

Doing my bit for Curlew conservation

The haunting call of the Eurasian Curlew (Numenius arquata) is one of the most iconic, and indeed, enjoyable sounds in nature. The rippling trill of Britain’s largest wading bird evoking mist-clad moorlands, windswept coastal estuaries and other exquisite wild places. It is a sound which, once heard, is not soon forgotten; the very embodiment of…

Young Naturalists on Unpaid Conservation Internships

My views on unpaid, long-term conservation internships undulate substantially. On one hand, and from firsthand experience, I know the benefits such placements bring; in terms of the acquisition of skills, networking opportunities, personal development and, of course, contribution to the great work of our NGOs. I also, however, and again from my own experience, see…

Martin Hughes-Games is wrong about Planet Earth

For clarities sake, let us get this out of the way first: I, personally, am a fan of both the Planet Earth series and presenter Martin Hughes-Games. More fond of the former than the latter, in truth, but boasting a positive perception of both. This post is not at all intended as an attack on Martin….

40km for Curlew Conservation

The haunting call of the Curlew is one of the most iconic, and enjoyable, sounds in nature. Especially in Britain: where rippling trill of our largest wading bird evokes images of heather clad, misty moorlands and windswept coastal estuaries. It is a sound that ensnares many, myself included; though one that, sadly, is heard less often these…

2016: A Wild Year In Retrospect (Part 1)

It has become somewhat of a tradition on this blog to, near the turn of the year, dwell momentarily on the high-points of the months past. To look back over my experiences and attempt to rank them based on my own enjoyment – if only for a spot of personal amusement. Truthfully, 2016 has been brilliant…

Writing: Life Lessons From 2016

Writing, tweeting and generally posting anything into the public domain is a sure fire way to stress yourself out, though it is thoroughly rewarding. 2016 has been a wonderful year in truth: it has helped refine my career ambitions, seen a number of gains on my part and provided me with a number of fantastic opportunities to…

10 Words of Advice to Aspiring Conservationists (Part 2)

Last week I posted with regards to aspiring conservationists, offering some advice towards those seeking a career in the environmental sector. Part one proved somewhat popular and can be found HERE for those interested. And, following on from this, this post will cover the remaining points not included within last week. For those who have…

An Introduction to the Youth Nature Movement – Ben Eagle

There is something notable happening in conservation. For years, conservationists have bemoaned the perceived lack of interest that younger people take in the natural world. They point to nature deficit disorder as a distinct consequence of a generation of children lacking outdoor experiences. The internet is cast as a negative force, with children spending upwards…

10 Words of Advice to Aspiring Conservationists (Part 1)

With the world and its wildlife in an altogether precarious state at present, never before has there been a greater need for people to protect it. The enduring decline of biodiversity and the prophesied collapse of our natural environment, mercifully, coming at a time when a career in conservation appears rather fashionable. Now, more people than…

Our Ampthibians Are In Trouble

Tales of localised and even global extinctions are, unfortunately, rather common in the amphibian world. Particularly in current times as humans continue to ignorantly erode biodiversity on a global scale. From the endearing Rabbs’ Tree Frog, recently declared extinct after the last known individual died in captivity, to the similarly alluring Golden Toad. Amphibians are…

Perceptions of Wildlife: The Young Conservationist

Another “perceptions of wildlife” guest blog this week, following the same setup as the last post by urban humanist Tayla May. This week’s post comes from young conservationist and budding scientist David Hunter, who was asked the same questions regarding his perceptions of wildlife and often controversial species. As you will see, his answers demonstrate…