Farmers are not the problem: I am, and you might be too

The recent State of Nature report paints a bleak picture of modern Britain. One in which wildlife populations tumble and wild spaces are hemmed in, degraded and destroyed. Unfortunately, most of us will recognise this as the norm and at a relatively youthful 26-years old, it worries me that this is all I have everContinue reading “Farmers are not the problem: I am, and you might be too”

The answer to the climate crisis isn’t reusable coffee cups, by Sophie Johnson

We’ve got 12 years to prevent irreversible climate damage. If we don’t see drastic change by 2030, our children will be immersed in persistent heatwaves, flooding, and increased poverty. By the end of this century, we will most likely lose all rainforests, coral reefs, and 50% of all plant and animal species on this planet.Continue reading “The answer to the climate crisis isn’t reusable coffee cups, by Sophie Johnson”

Nets Down for Nature: when people power works for wildlife

There is rarely any cause for hope in the environmental field. Indeed, everywhere we look, habitats are being erased, ecosystems dismantled and vulnerable species pushed ever closer to the brink of annihilation. It can be grim, at times, and outright depressing at others. Every once in a while, however, something bucks the trend – theContinue reading “Nets Down for Nature: when people power works for wildlife”

Adventures in Conservation, by Andrew Gorton

Moving to the North Norfolk coast from London in 2007, I realised how little I knew about the beautiful countryside I found myself in. Fortunately, this part of the country is not lacking in opportunities to explore and develop a burgeoning passion for conservation and wildlife. I’d also begun a degree in natural sciences withContinue reading “Adventures in Conservation, by Andrew Gorton”

There is no need to choose between Monbiot and Attenborough: the ways of both are vital.

I am part of a generation that idolises David Attenborough and, like many younger conservationists, have long extolled the virtues of his breathtaking documentaries for their stark impact on my life. From the Life of Birds to Planet Earth, these are the shows that ignited and then nurtured my passion for the natural world and,Continue reading “There is no need to choose between Monbiot and Attenborough: the ways of both are vital.”

Driven Grouse Shooting: the Bluff’s Been Called, by Les Wallace

This post was originally written for  Bowland Raptor Politics. The thoughts expressed here are those of the author alone and do not necessarily represent my own. Well with clockwork regularity another season’s fledged hen harriers ‘disappear’ over grouse moor. They’re not even making an effort to throttle back in the face of growing censure inContinue reading “Driven Grouse Shooting: the Bluff’s Been Called, by Les Wallace”

Bumper breeding season for rare waders

It was uplifting to learn that Black-tailed Godwits, the elegant wading birds at the heart of the outstanding Project Godwit initiative, have enjoyed a bumper breeding season in Southern England. Below you will find a news release from the organisations involved in the PG scheme for you to peruse at your leisure – surely weContinue reading “Bumper breeding season for rare waders”

RSPB criticised for protecting birds… fancy that?

This week, the depths of social media have been filled with grumblings of discontent aimed at the RSPB for their use of lethal control as a conservation tool on their land: to protect threatened curlew (and other ground-nesting birds), to restore woodland and to protect a suite of native fauna from damaging invasive species. ToContinue reading “RSPB criticised for protecting birds… fancy that?”

The North-West Rare Plant Initiative, a guest blog by Joshua Styles

The concept of island biogeography was first laid out by MacArther & Wilson (1967) in a book entitled ‘The Theory of Island Biogeography’. The concept was relatively simple in its key principles; that ‘islands’ that are small are capable of supporting fewer species than larger ‘islands’, and that the further away these ‘islands’ are fromContinue reading “The North-West Rare Plant Initiative, a guest blog by Joshua Styles”

UK’s most endangered butterfly thrown a lifeline by the National Trust

The enigmatic High Brown Fritillary, the UK’s most endangered butterfly, has been thrown a vital lifeline in 2018 through the creation of a new conservation project led by the National Trust and partners. With the charity now embarking on an ambitious plan to develop 60 hectares of lowland heath and wood pasture – the butterfly’sContinue reading “UK’s most endangered butterfly thrown a lifeline by the National Trust”

A tentative step in the right direction | Some thoughts on the 25-year Environment Plan

This past week, and to an equal mix of fanfare and apprehension, the government released its long-awaited 25-year plan to improve the environment. A full outline of which can be found here, for those interested. I would advise all to have a read. The plan, launched in style by the PM herself, sets out a long-termContinue reading “A tentative step in the right direction | Some thoughts on the 25-year Environment Plan”

Want to inspire more young naturalists? Then its time to celebrate those we already have

There is an awful lot of negativity in the environmental field. Little wonder really, given the sorry state of the wider countryside, the downward trends displayed by many wildlife populations, climate change and the continued prominence of issues such as land mismanagement and plastic pollution. Indeed, everywhere we look another ecosystem faces ruin, and bothContinue reading “Want to inspire more young naturalists? Then its time to celebrate those we already have”